Biodiversity conservation in South Africa

In Namaqualand (Western Cape, South Africa), the natural rehabilitation of plants is assisted by fencing off conservation plots to safeguard the original plants from mining and grazing.

Biodiversity conservation in South Africa

The area along the West Coast of South Africa, known as Namaqualand, has more than 1 324 flowering plant species, 266 species endemic to the area.

In Namaqualand (Western Cape, South Africa), the natural rehabilitation of plants is assisted by fencing off conservation plots to safeguard the original plants from mining and grazing. This ensures that the vegetation has a core area to thrive and distribute seeds onto the restored quarry area. In addition to this, Saint-Gobain does environmental monitoring (dust monitoring with containers and adapted Polca samplers; climate monitoring with an automatic weather station (AWS); and vegetation monitoring by the line intercept method at transects). 

During 2009, Cape Nature (www.capenature.co.za) approached Saint-Gobain regarding a conservation area that they were establishing in the Knersvlakte of Namaqualand. Saint-Gobain is the owner of a property called Wolvenest. Wolvenest was identified as part of an essential core area of the Knersvlakte Priority Area.

Saint-Gobain agreed to place Wolvenest under custodianship of Cape Nature as part of the Knersvlakte Priority Area.

The Cape Nature Conservation Board took over management of the farm with regard to conservation, without removing Saint-Gobain’s ownership or access to this property. The custodianship shows the company’s commitment to environmental conservation and respect for biodiversity.